The Blade Doctor

is pleased to announce

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Phantom Edge Shears!

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October 25, 2018

Other sharpeners is the NYS Capital Region are not happy with The Blade Doctor. Why? Because Gabriel takes the time to educate stylists and does his j...

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Shear Maintenance (Part II)

It’s not easy finding a sharpener you can trust. You never know if you are getting the most knowledgeable person; someone who knows the proper way to sharpen beauty shears. Let’s face it, your shears cost 2, 3, 400 dollars or more. You can’t afford to have them ruined by some amateur sharpener who claims he/she is the best in the area.

 

The most important thing you can do for yourself is to educate yourself. You should know what your shears are supposed to look like, even after they’ve been sharpened. You should be able to tell the difference between a convex edge, micro-bevel, and beveled edge. You should be able to get your shears back from the sharpener and say, “Thanks, great job, they feel like new.” Or, “Whoa, wait a minute, something is not right. These have a bevel. These are Japanese shears, they shouldn’t have a bevel.”

 

The following websites have some great information on Shear Education. It’s a great place to start…

https://www.senseishears.com/shear-education-quick-reference

http://www.precisionsharpening.net/about_scissors

https://www.washiscissor.com/shear-knowledge/#Types_of_Blades

 

First, let’s learn the difference between a convex edge and a beveled edge and a micro-bevel.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Convex Edge (Honed Edge):

Japanese made

State of the art

Made for slide cutting, point cutting, wisping, etc

Has a very sharp edge and require less force

 

Beveled Edge (Non-Honed Edge):

German made

Durable due to the thickness of the blade

Usually made with corrugations to grab and hold hair, making it good for coarse or synthetic hair

                                                             Not suitable for more advanced cutting techniques

 

Micro-Beveled Edge (Semi-Convex):

A hybrid of convex and beveled

It is a more narrow beveled edge, but not a true convex edge

Many sharpeners use this method if they are unable to fully convex the shears as it is less likely to be noticed

 

If your shears were very expensive and are Japanese made, then they are most likely convex shears. These shears should not be returned to you with a beveled edge or a micro-bevel; the blade should be rounded and come to a perfect point. It should not look like the edge of a kitchen knife. Fortunately, The Blade Doctor knows how to properly convex your expensive, Japanese beauty shears. The Blade Doctor is here to Bring Your Blades Back To Life!

 

 

 

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